Ex 10b. Stalling

Aim:

To recognise and enter a fully-developed stall from various modes of flight both straight and turning, and then to recover with minimum height-loss to a safe flight mode. Also to recover to a safe flight mode at the incipient stall stage.

Airmanship:

  • Special attention to lookout – clearing turn to check rear
  • Checks to ensure safe operation through exercise i.e.: height/location etc

Principles and characteristics at the stall:

  • Effectiveness of controls
  • Inherent stability of aircraft at stall e.g. Washout
  • Buffet and other indications e.g. Severe rearward bar pressure on weightshift aircraft
  • Wing dropping tendencies and correct handling of controls i.e. dangers of using roll control to level wings at the point of stall.

Factors affecting the stalling speed:

  • Flaps (if applicable)
  • Power
  • Weight
  • Load factor i.e. centrifugal force in steep turns

Full Stall and recovery; (from straight flight – level, climbing and descending)

  • Use of controls
  • Use of power (Recovery with and without the use of power)

Full Stall and recovery; (from turning flight – 30° angle of bank – level, climbing and descending)

  • Use of controls
  • Use of power (recovery with and without the use of power)

Stall and recovery at the incipient stage:

  • Recovery during various attitudes and configurations
  • Recovery during changing configurations

Stalling at higher speed:

  • Secondary stall
  • ‘g’ stall